Another factor that contributes to the development of an individual is how they perceive their gender in relation to their identity.

Theorist are each looking for a different and unique way of conceptualizing the why of human behavior. These theories tap into aspects of diversity, but none manage to address all facets. Historically, two development directions were identified- nomothetic­ or rules that govern the linear and equal development of all people and idiographic- the belief that individuals experience development distinctively through the contribution of unique factors throughout their lifetime (Scarr, 1992). Scarr (1992) poses that both these theories are true but limited in their full understanding of development across the lifespan as their observations of humanity are partial and not completely inclusive of all there is to know about human development.

When looking at gender as a diversity characteristic within the context of development there are many factors that contribute to the individual journey taken by each type. Majority of experience comes from the environment one grows up in and contributes to their overall sense of belonging (Scarr, 1992). Parenting is another factor that contributes to the development of children, especially their identity in regard to their gender. Parents influence through both their personal beliefs passed down, as well as the environment they raise their children in. Another factor that contributes to the development of an individual is how they perceive their gender in relation to their identity. In the current climate within the United States there are a lot of different opinions and practices on how each gender should define themselves.

The idiographic theory that each individual has a unique experience within the context of their reality and with the contributing factors coming from society, parents, and their environment compliments the normal developmental trajectory that most children take (nomothetic). Theories are limited in their ability to observe all aspects of diversity, but utilizing a collection of them may fill in the gaps and be sufficient in addressing the diversity that exists across all humanity.

References

Scarr, S. (1992). Developmental theories for the 1990s: Development and individual differences. Child Development, 63(1), 1–19. https://doi-org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.2307/1130897